Nothing worse than a drowned bandicoot in your pool

April 27, 2010 by · 27 Comments
Filed under: Australian Mammals 
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An unwelcome surprise in your pool – a drowned native marsupial

Ever gone outside in the morning to admire your pool and found that there is something dead floating in the water? Unfortunately, lots of native wildlife drown each year in backyard swimming pools, not because they cannot swim, it is because they cannot get out and swim until they are exhausted and then drown.

Doug Beckers with drowned juvenile Northern Brown Bandicoot

Doug Beckers with a drowned juvenile long-nosed bandicoot

Northern Brown Bandicoot

A juvenile long-nosed bandicoot that drowned in a backyard swimming pool

I have heard stories of adult northern-brown bandicoots, long-nosed bandicoots, snakes falling into swimming pools and koalas fall into backyard swimming pools on the NSW coast and will drown in pools if they cannot get out.

Why can’t they get out?

Well most Australian wildlife can swim very well -check out the koala video below Read more

New Holland Mouse and House Mouse

July 30, 2009 by · 5 Comments
Filed under: Australian Mammals, Fire 
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New Holland Mouse (Pseudomys novaehollandiae) vs House Mouse in an area recovering from wildfire

In June 2009 we did some small mammal trapping at Lake Munmorah State Conservation Area and we trapped within several areas of Wallum heath, a plant community dominated by Wallum Banksia (Banksia aemula).

Wallum Heath

Wallum heath in Munmorah State Conservation Area, pre-fire.

One of the areas of the Wallum heath was burnt in a wildfire in February this year and I suspected that we would find the Read more

BAER Team – Victorian Fires 2009 – Wildlife and Fauna Assessment

July 11, 2009 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Australian Mammals, Fire 
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Wildlife and Fauna Assessment – Kilmore Murrindindi Fire – Victoria Fires 2009

Assessing the actions that are critical to the recovery of the animals affected by the Kilmore-Murrindindi Fire was one of the first tasks of the BAER fauna team. The fauna team comprised of Doug Beckers Biodiversity Officer NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service, Lisa Jameson – Fauna Specialist (US Fish and Wildlife Service), Peter Menkhorst – Victorian Fauna Specialist, Ken Griggs- Fauna Specialist (US Fish and Wildlife Service) and Steve Smith – local Flora and fauna expert, Department of Sustainabililty and the Environment.

Murrindindi - Doug Beckers - Lisa Jameson - Peter Menkhorst - Ken Griggs

Doug Beckers, Lisa Jameson, Peter Menkhorst and Ken Griggs, BAER Fauna Team

Assessing the critical impacts on Fauna and Wildlife is a huge task Read more

Mount Royal Nightlife

May 27, 2009 by · 1 Comment
Filed under: Australian Mammals 
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Doing the loop looking for gliders.

Looking for animals in the Australian bush is quite often best done at night as many of the creatures are nocturnal and can only be seen when it gets dark. Richard Ali, Vicki Elliott and I did some spotlighting at Mount Royal National Park while undertaking a Rufous Bettong survey and we saw lots of wildlife, some I had never seen before.

Trapping Folk

Wildlife researchers, Richard Ali, Richard Harris and Vicki Elliott having a break at Youngville picnic area, Mount Royal National Park

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Something special in our cage trap

May 19, 2009 by · 11 Comments
Filed under: Australian Mammals 
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Trapping animals is sometimes like a lucky dip.

Just imagine you are in a beautiful national park undertaking a wildlife survey where you have 48 cage traps setup, each trap about 250 metres apart. You have to drive through fabulous tall eucalypt forests and rainforest to check the traps and there is wildlife running across the road all the time. You never know when you get out of the car and then walk into the bushland what is inside the trap.

Sometimes we capture something very special, and on my recent trip to Mount Royal National Park we captured one of mainland Australia’s rarest animals, a Spotted-tailed Quoll.

Quoll Trapping

Spotted-tailed Quoll inside capture bag

This beautiful animal was trapped in a cage trap and lured into there by Read more

Spy cameras in the rainforest

May 17, 2009 by · 3 Comments
Filed under: Australian Mammals 
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Digital camera technology is just wonderful for wildlife observations.

During a recent wildlife survey at Mount Royal National Park near Singleton in New South Wales, Australia, our survey team, Richard Ali, Vicki Elliott, Richard Harris and myself deployed weatherproof cameras into rainforest and Eucalypt forests to observe wildlife.

Red-necked Pademelon

Red-necked Pademelon caught with a remote camera

The cameras automatically take a photograph once movement is Read more

Did we catch a potoroo?

May 15, 2009 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Australian Mammals 
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So, did we manage to catch a potoroo at Mount Royal National Park?

Mount Royal National Park
Well, yes and no. The trapping in our cage traps was unsuccessful for potoroos, but we were successful for other animals. But more of this later.

What sort of trapping were we doing at Mount Royal National Park?

We laid out 48 cage traps in 3 lots of 16, each trap was about 250 metres apart. Each cage trap was accompanied by Read more

On the hunt for a Long-nosed Potoroo

May 3, 2009 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Australian Mammals 
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Searching for a long-nosed potoroo

This week I’m off to Mt Royal to search for Long-nosed potoroos, rufous bettongs, spotted-tailed quolls and Hastings River Mice. All of these are threatened Australian Mammals, the potaroo and the bettong are kangaroo-like animals but are only about 30-40cm tall. The quoll is a carnivore and the ones we catch are about 2kg and very interesting when handled and the Hastings River Mouse is obviously a rodent.

These medium sized animals are caught in a cage trap like the one shown below. We use a bait ball comprised of peanut butter and honey, and a piece of bread with strawberry jam as the bait. Sometimes we catch birds and large goannas as well in the traps.

Animal Trap with possum - dougbeckers.com

A cage trap used to capture medium sized animals

Hopefully we won’t get much rain, looking forward to the company. I’ll fill you in on what we caught when I get back in a week as there is no phone reception or an internet connection where I’m staying.

Search for an endangered mouse – Part 3

April 24, 2009 by · 1 Comment
Filed under: Australian Mammals 
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The Good, Bad and the Ugly of searching for the Hastings River Mouse.

Searching for an endangered species sounds like a lot of fun, and quite adventurous also. Finding an endangered animal such as a Hastings River Mouse is a real thrill, and finding several is a hoot!

The trapping I’ve done in the Mt Royal area for the Hastings River Mouse has also been really hard work. The weather has not always been kind to us Read more

Search for an endangered mouse – Part 2

March 24, 2009 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Australian Mammals 
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How to catch an Endangered Hastings River Mouse.

Hastings River Mouse captures - dougbeckers.comWe need somewhere to trap, something to trap them in, some bait as a lure a way to handle them, a way to measure them and sex them and then a way to Read more

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